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Building a wooden canopy yourself

In this application example, a wooden canopy is created for a front entrance door. The HK 85 carpentry portable circular saw with various attachments is mainly used for timber cutting. The Domino XL is used to manufacture various different joints.

    Description

    Creating a canopy

    A wooden canopy protects the front entrance door and adds significantly to the character of a house. Depending on the design and shape of the roof canopy, creating one requires some basic knowledge of carpentry. This application example describes how to handle and use the machines. The required marking (marking out) of the processing steps is not contained in this application example.

    Material list

    • The material depends on the type of construction and is selected accordingly
    • 10 x 10 cm cross-cuts are used for the basic structure
    • 8 x 12 cm wood is used for the rafters
    • 10 x 16 cm wood is used for the hip rafters

    Tools/accessories

    The following tools and accessories are recommended for use in this application example:

    Preparation/set-up

    • Marking and laying out the wood for the basic structure

      The wood for the threshold cornice and the two posts are marked according to the drawing and supported on trestles.

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      Laying the wood out ready
    • Preparing the portable circular saw

      The HK 132 is used for cutting the wood. In order to use the guide rail later, the parallel side fence is fitted on the motor side and fully pushed up and attached to the machine table. In this position, the GC 1000-WA gauge marker can be used.

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      Preparing the portable circular saw
    • Placing the guide rail

      The guide rail is fitted with the gauge marker and laid out.

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      Placing the guide rail
    • The correct position for the guide rail is determined using the gauge marker. In this case, a cut at 0° should be produced. After it has been aligned, the rail can be fixed with clamps.

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      Aligning

    Procedure

    • Cutting using the HK 132

      The portable circular saw is now guided precisely through the rail via the parallel side fence. The correct position can be checked on the machine gauge marker. The cutting depth is set to 12.5 cm.

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      Cutting
    • Cutting using the HK 132

      Make the cut and repeat the procedure for all 90° cuts required.

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      Cutting
    • Flattening using the HK 132

      The threshold cornice wood should have laps (10 cm wide), as seen in the picture. To create these, the HK 132 is fitted with the flattening device. This allows flattening to a depth of 80 mm. The routing width is 50 mm. For wider flattening, the machine must be converted accordingly.

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      Flattening
    • Aligning the guide rail

      When using the flattening head on the HK 132, it is imperative that the machine is guided using a guide rail. 
      Tip: The GC 1000-WA angle stop is very well suited for aligning the rail precisely.  

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      Aligning the guide rail
    • The routing process is performed in two steps, since per routing operation a maximum of 50 mm can be removed. The position for the first routing operation is therefore marked at 50 mm.

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      First routing operation
    • The position of the guide rail can now be aligned via the gauge marker and fixed accordingly.

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      Aligning to the gauge marker
    • Setting the flattening depth

      The routing depth must be adjusted visually in advance of the milling groove. To do this, the flattening head is lowered until the planer blade meets the depth mark. Always disconnect the machine from the power supply when performing adjustments.

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      Setting the flattening depth
    • Completing the milling groove

      The machine can now be hung in the guide rail via the parallel side fence and the milling groove can be made.

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      Routing
    • Tip:

      To avoid splinters, chisel to the line in advance of the milling groove.

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      Chiselling beforehand
    • Carrying out the second routing operation

      For the second routing operation, the guide rail is repositioned as per the previous steps and the milling groove is made. The process is repeated for any other flattening required. 

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      Second routing operation
    • The lap joint can be cleaned out using a mortise axe or a chisel as required.

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      Cleaning out the lap joint
    • Cutting rafters

      The following steps describe how a bird's mouth notch should be cut in the rafters of the canopy. In order to do this, the wood is laid out and aligned to the markings. 

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      Aligning the wood
    • The HK 132 is fitted with a bird's mouth notch head, as described in the operating instructions.

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      Attaching the bird's mouth notch head
    • Setting the inclination

      The inclination is set according to the roof inclination (here 30°).

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      Setting the inclination
    • Setting the bird's mouth notch depth

      In order to set the appropriate bird's mouth notch depth, first refer to the table (on the motor). In this case, a bird's mouth notch at 30° roof inclination (Y-axis) and a bird's mouth notch depth of 25 mm (X-axis) should be cut. The setting depths can be read from the table. In this case, the depth is set at 85 mm.

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      Setting the bird's mouth notch depth
    • Fitting the parallel side fence

      It is imperative that a guide is secured for the milling groove. Later the guide rail will be used to guide via the fitted parallel side fence. If possible, the fence should be fitted on the right-hand side, in order for it to be supported better. The fence should be fitted at a distance of approximately 12–16 cm parallel to the machine table.

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      Fitting the parallel side fence
    • Side alignment of the milling machine

      In the next step, the milling machine must be aligned so that the bird's mouth notch head pre-cutter blade is positioned at the bird's mouth sinker line.

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      Aligning the side of the milling machine
    • Securing the guide rail

      If the side position of the milling machine has been determined, the rail is fixed and is also fixed at the same distance on the opposite side.

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      Securing the guide rail
    • Carrying out routing

      After the guide rail has been fixed and the depth set accordingly, a milling groove can be made.

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      Completing the milling groove
    • Cutting the rafter heads

      The rafter heads are usually cut after the bird's mouth notches have been created, in order to ensure there is enough support for the machine and the guide. This can also be handled differently according to the situation. In this example, the rafter head should now be cut at an angle of 60°. The cut is made on the cut side of the wood. For this step, the guide rail is aligned to the 60° crack by means of the gauge marker and fixed accordingly. The gauge marker range is selected by which the parallel side fence on the saw blade side is fitted at a distance of 70 mm from the machine bench. 

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      Cutting the rafter heads
    • Setting the parallel side fence for cutting the cut side

      The fence is fitted on the saw blade side at a distance of 70 mm and the machine can be guided safely. The aforementioned gauge marker range on the gauge marker can be used in this position.

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      Setting the parallel side fence for cutting the cut side
    • Carrying out the angled cut

      Note: The cut is carried out using the gauge marker correctly, in this case on the cut side ("saw blade to the left of the line")

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      Carrying out the angled cut
    • Completing the eaves section of the rafters

      In order to carry out a right-angled cut, the parallel side fence is fitted on the motor side again and, using the angle stop, the cut is carried out accordingly.

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      Cutting the eaves section of the rafters
    • Drilling holes in the bird's mouth notch corner to secure the rafters

      The holes for the necessary securing of the rafters are drilled after cutting the rafter heads using the cordless drill and a 7–8 mm auger drill bit.

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      Holes in the bird's mouth notch corner to secure the rafters
    • Sanding the rafter heads

      It is recommended that the rafter heads and exposed surfaces are sanded directly after cutting. When joined together, there is an optimum and large support surface. A quick result can be achieved using the belt sander (80 and 100 grit).

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      Sanding rafter heads
    • Creating a mitre cut on the rafters

      In this example, all rafters must have a mitre cut in order to lie comfortably in the hip rafters. These cuts are also created using the HK 132. To do this, all rafters are laid out, aligned and cut in one processing step using the GC 1000-WA angle stop.

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      Creating mitre cuts on the rafters
    • Cutting the eaves cut on the hip rafters

      The hip rafters must have two 45° cuts. To do this, all hip rafters are laid out, aligned and cut using the angle stop. First the angle is set at the angle stop and later aligned and fixed using the gauge marker. 

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      Cutting the eaves cut on the hip rafters
    • To make the cut, the parallel side fence is fitted again on the saw blade side at a distance of 70 mm to the machine bench and the cut is made. Repeat the process then for any cuts required.

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      Making the cut
    • Creating other cuts

      The horizontal eave cuts on the hip rafters and cutting the braces are carried out as previously described using the angle stop.

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      Creating other cuts
    • Deburring the hip rafters

      In order to carry out the required deburring of the hip rafters (roof-shaped bevel on the upper surface), the appropriate machine angle is set on the portable circular saw and the deburring is carried out using the parallel side fence.

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      Deburring the hip rafters
    • Creating a hip rafter bird's mouth notch

      The hip rafter bird's mouth notches (heart milling) require several work steps. First the wood fibres are trimmed using a chisel, in order to prevent splintering later.

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      Creating a hip rafter bird's mouth notch
    • Creating a hip rafter bird's mouth notch

      The horizontal bird's mouth cut can be carried out using the SSU 200 sword saw and a guide rail.

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      Creating a hip rafter bird's mouth notch
    • Creating a hip rafter bird's mouth notch

      For the cuts in the rear area of the bird's mouth notch, the cordless oscillator is fitted with a long blade and the bird's mouth notch can be machined.

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      Creating a hip rafter bird's mouth notch
    • Sanding pre-cut wood

      All wood can be sanded after cutting. A quick result can be achieved using the belt sander (80–100 grit)

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      Sanding finished wood
    • All edges are now processed using the edge router. The 45° chamfer cutter is used in this case. The edge router is highly recommended when processing the rafter head area, as it cannot tip over through the small bench opening. 

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      Machining edges using the edge router
    • Joint between the posts and the threshold cornice

      The Domino XL is used to join each post to the threshold wood. Two 14 x 100 mm dominoes are used for each to secure in position and to make fitting easier.

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      Post and threshold cornice joint
    • Joint between the posts and the threshold cornice

      The first milling groove should be routed 30 mm from the edge. This can be read comfortably using the scale and the domino routing placed accordingly. Attention: Set the associated routing depth.

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      Post and threshold cornice joint
    • Joint between the posts and the threshold cornice

      The position of the second milling groove is set using the stop pins. In this case, the first pin is used. The process is repeated for the sills and posts.

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      Post and threshold cornice joint
    • Joint between the braces and the sills

      In order to place two domino dowels, first the brace must be brought into the correct position and then two axis markings made. Here the dowels are then routed into the brace and the post.

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      Joint between braces and sills
    • Joint between the braces and the sills

      The Domino router is positioned on the axis markings and the two milling grooves are routed.

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      Joint between braces and sills
    • Joint between the braces and the sills

      The appropriate milling grooves are made and the joint (securing in position) of the two components is created.

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      Joint between braces and sills
    • Assembly

      Once all dowelling joints have been created, the required screws can be inserted using a cordless drill or cordless impact screwdriver. It is recommended that a test assembly be performed before the final assembly of the canopy.

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      Assembly
    • Sanding the structure

      It may be necessary to sand the transitions too. This sanding can be completed quickly using the ROTEX. Using the coarse sanding function, a high material removal rate can be achieved, which can be very useful when sanding the end grain. After coarse sanding, switch to the sanding function, in order to achieve an optimum surface result.

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      Sanding the structure
    • Assembly

      For the assembly, first the posts are fixed to the already assembled braces. For the final assembly, appropriate fasteners must be selected depending on the substrate. It may then be necessary to drill additional holes. Then the threshold cornice wood abutting the wall can be inserted and secured. The Domino dowel makes assembly easier and the joint fits straight away.

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      Assembly
    • Assembly

      Then the remainder of the threshold wood can be assembled. Sometimes the rafters can be pre-assembled and the whole assembly can simply be mounted and appropriately fixed.

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      Assembly
    • Assembly

      Attach the remaining jack rafters using appropriate screws. This can be carried out comfortably and without kickback using the cordless impact screwdriver.

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      Assembly
    • Final sanding

      A cordless sander is perfect for smaller sanding jobs after assembly at the destination. Here the cordless Delta sander is used to sand off small dirty spots or smudges, marks or other imperfections.

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      Final sanding
    • End results

      The result is a self-built wooden canopy. Creating it is simple with the right tool. After cutting and a test assembly, nothing stands in the way of assembly at the destination.

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      End results
    1. Our illustrated guides and work results are documented working steps that we have performed in practice. They are individual examples and do not guarantee or promise that users will obtain the same results. The results will depend on the user's experience and skill, as well as the material being used. Illustrated guides do not replace any Festool operating manuals and/or safety instructions. Liability for ensuring that the information, instructions and applications are free from content defects and defects of title, in particular with regard to the absence of defects, correctness, freedom from third party intellectual property rights and copyrights, completeness and fitness for purpose, is excluded. Claims for damages made by the user, regardless of their legal basis, are excluded. These liability exclusions are not applicable if the damage was intentional or caused by gross negligence, or in cases of statutory liability.

      We cannot accept liability for damage resulting from defects.